Tag: Camping

nocmanus September 30, 2016 0

Finding the Perfect Campsite

You’ve been trekking all day in the wilderness. Your tired, sore and ready to get into your sleeping bag. The campsite is a important part of your backpacking experience. A good campsite definitely contributes to a great trip…and a poor campsite can make your trip more difficult. The rule of thumb is to understand Leave No Trace principals to guide you in your decision.

First and foremost, (if your planning a backpacking trip in a National Park) you will have to fill out an Itinerary, or apply for a Backcountry Permit. In this case, your choice is made for you. However, in a designated Wilderness Area, backcountry sites can be subject to different rules and regulations depending on that designated area. Generally, backcountry camping is recommended at least 200 feet from Meadows, lakeshores, and streams. If you are in a designated Wilderness Area, here are some things to look for: TIPS from LNT

  • Practice low-impact camping.
  • Set your tent on a durable surface like rock, bare ground, sand, or gravel to protect fragile areas.
  • Camp at established campsites when possible.
  • Camp at least 200 feet away from water.
  • Good campsites are found, not made!!!
  • Always try and use and existing fire ring.

Sometimes however, a made campsite is ok, IF you understand that you have to clear all evidence that you have been there. This is the quintessential guide for Leave NO Trace.  There are sometimes when making your own camp area is necessarily if you just can’t make it to where you want to go.

There are other key things to remember also:

Water sources nearby? And, will it be easy to get water?

Disposing of waste. Make sure you have plenty of room and 200 feet from water sources.

Look for dead trees nearby. You don’t want to pitch your tent under a dead or dying limb

Speaking of tree limbs, are there adequete limbs to hang your Bear Bag?

Know the rules & regulations of the area that you will be backpacking in. ALL Wilderness Area’s have their own PDF sites to help you plan and prepare your trip.

Remember that practicing Leave No Trace makes a fun and safe trip for the next person who meanders into that camp area. It also protects the wildlife.

See you on the Trail.